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You may walk away from a minor car crash, such as a rear-end collision, not realizing that you suffered a significant head injury. 

Vehicle crashes are a leading cause of TBI, but your body may mask injury symptoms for hours if not days. 

Traumatic brain injury 

There are two forms of traumatic brain injury or TBI. The open form refers to an injury caused when a foreign object penetrates the skull and enters the brain. The closed form, which is much more common, occurs when there is a blow to the head. For example, the impact of a rear-end collision could cause you to strike your head on the windshield or steering wheel. This might result in a concussion, which is a mild TBI, or a more serious brain injury. 

What happens during impact 

During the impact of a car crash, the brain may push against the skull, resulting in bruising. In fact, different sections of your brain can move independently and tear nerve tissue. Due to the impact, ions and chemicals in the brain can change and impair the function of nerve cells, some of which may lose the ability to communicate with other cells. 

A variety of symptoms 

Many symptoms could indicate a traumatic brain injury: 

  • Headache or nausea 
  • Confusion or disorientation 
  • Dizziness or balance issues 
  • Blurred vision 
  • Sensitivity to light or noise 
  • Drowsiness or fatigue 
  • Memory or concentration issues 
  • Depression, anxiety or other changes in mood 

The importance of a medical evaluation 

If you should become the victim of a car crash, see a doctor as soon as possible, even if you feel fine. You could have underlying injuries, including a concussion or more serious TBI. Your well-being is the primary concern, but a written medical report about your injury is also important. It will provide essential information to accompany your claim for financial compensation to cover your medical expenses and more.